hashcat

hashcat

Hashcat is a password recovery tool, one of the fastest because it also uses the power of the GPU as well as that of the classic CPU. With hashcat you can do brute-force or dictionary attacks to an encrypted password.

Dictionary attack

Once you get a password’s hash, you can start a dictionary attack with following command:

hashcat  --force -m 1800 -a 0 hash.txt /path/dictionary.txt -o result.txt

Explanation:

--force = ignore warnings; it is useful if hashcat
          is runnings from a virtual Kali Linux
          machine;
-m 1800 = the -m option indicates the type of
          decryption to be used... in this case
          1800 point to SHA-512 hash  ($6);
          there are many hash types supported
          by hashcat; see hashcat's help for
          full list;
-a 0 = the -a option means the type of attack
       to execute:
       0 | Straight (dictionary attack)
       1 | Combination
       3 | Brute-force
       6 | Hybrid Wordlist + Mask
       7 | Hybrid Mask + Wordlist
hash.txt = it is the file containing the hash;
/path/dictionary.txt = it is the file containig
                       the wordlist for a
                       dictionary attack;
-o result.txt = it is the file in which a
                positive result will
                saved.
Brute-force attack

To make a brute-force attack, otherwise, the command will be the following:

hashcat -m 0 -a 3 hash.txt ?a -o result.txt

​Explanation:

-m 0 = type of decryption to be used (see
       above and see hashcat's help);
-a 3 = attack type (3 = brute force attack):
       0 | Straight (dictionary attack)
       1 | Combination
       3 | Brute-force
       6 | Hybrid Wordlist + Mask
       7 | Hybrid Mask + Wordlist
hash.txt = it is the file containing the hash;
?a = character set to use for brute-force attack:
     l | abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz
     u | ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
     d | 0123456789
     s | !"#$%&'()*+,-./:;<=>[email protected][\]^_`{|}~
     a | ?l?u?d?s
     b | 0x00 - 0xff

     in this case ?a options means all possible
     characters.
     For example, if we use ?l?l?l?l?d?d  to
     make a brute-force attack  we specify that
     the first 4 characters are only lowercase
     letters and the last 2 are only numbers;
-o result.txt = it is the file in which a
                positive result will be
                saved.
5 1 vote
Article Rating
Subscribe
Notify of
guest
2 Comments
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
dustin
Guest
dustin
November 5, 2021 7:19 am

lots of useful information